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"IN RONDO WE TRUST"

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Celtics Morning Joe:Concerned about Rondo's health later on

Posted by shawn cassidy on August 27, 2012 at 6:00 AM


In the worn-down days of  a cold winter, with the fire glaring into our souls. The night sinks early as the sun goes down early once again. The days creep slowly like a house cat looking at a spider spinning a web. From frosted white tree tops. The tattered shreds of cloud release the moon light for a moment.



The hard days of winter remind me of athletes who fall apart early in their careers. They seem to throw caution to the wind. They give everything to the sport they love. Rajon Rondo falls into the same category in my opinion.  Rondo is unique like a snowflake, but he's not superhuman. He can start  breaking down in a few years, or maybe  much longer. But it's hard to pin point when he starts to fall apart. He could follow the same career path as Larry Bird?  Bird was an early bird when it comes to career nagging injuries.



Rondo puts his body on the line every time he hits the floor. I don't think he can change that. It's his art, and  it's his passion. It made him into the player he is today. So cooling off is out the window. Rondo needs some luck. Maybe some guys can get away with it, and they can allow their bodies to go through so much pain. But if you look at history. Guys who give so much like a Larry Bird, or an Allen Iverson. Seem to fall apart around 32 or younger. 



I hate to think about Rondo breaking down, but Paul raised the question yesterday.But I think about  Rondo being like a dimly lit sky  that fades to grey, and the serene winter wasteland is rid of subtleties. Constant snowfall, nature's scourging plague infects us all at times. But it seems like  life in this terrible zone is far and between. Only death can be the king to such a forsaken place. A forsaken place for athletes is a broke down body unwilling to give anymore.



Categories: Celtics Morning Joe

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7 Comments

Reply paul
8:39 AM on August 27, 2012 
When Cowens retired, he wrote an article that was published in the paper, explaining to the fans why he was retiring. Typical Cowens. He always did things his own way, and he was always uncomfortable with the separations of fame. He explained that he had sprained his feet thirty times or more, and that because of this, and other things, his body just wouldn't do what it used to do, and that this was incredibly frustrating for him. Even so it took a combination of Robert Parish and Kevin Mchale to replace him. Bill Fitch said that even in his last year, as a shadow of his former self, Cowens was the best defensive center in the league. He was a player who threw himself body and soul at the game. Rondo and Cowens will always be linked by this. It's not surprising that each player's iconic play involves him throwing himself to the floor after a loose ball. The other Boston player they remind me of is Bobby Orr. They all played/play with a passion that has gone out of style. But when you watch them you can't help but wonder, why play any other way? Its' like watching Tony Bennett vs. watching Billy Holliday. Tony Bennett is such a master craftsman. He could go on singing for another century. But the reason to sing is a Billy Holiday. The reason to love sports is a Bobby Orr, a Rajon Rondo.

Rondo is about to give us five of the best years basketball has ever seen. And then he may not be around much longer, though with his keen intelligence, he could be around a long time. He can always find a way to contribute. But I don't see him hanging onto the game like Jason Kidd. Hold on Boston and NBA fans. This man is about to change the game. And then he'll be gone into the night...
Reply Franklin
9:47 AM on August 27, 2012 
Id say Rondo has five more great years as well. Maybe one or two more after. Rondo may just shock us and play until he's 40.
Reply paul
9:53 AM on August 27, 2012 
Franklin says...
Id say Rondo has five more great years as well. Maybe one or two more after. Rondo may just shock us and play until he's 40.


He may, but I don't think he'll play long after his physical skills begin to decline. He'll be itching to coach!!
Reply Morena
10:44 AM on August 27, 2012 
Wow.
I've never thought about this.
I'm the type of person that always think that bad things does not happen, until I smash into the wall full force when they actually happen. I always think positive, trying not to loose contact with the reality.

I admit that this post made me worry more than a little bit.
When I look at Rondo I think: how can anything happen to him that end his carreer? How can such a great light be suddenly shut down? I haven't been around sports long enough to see a lot of carreer ending injury, but every time they struck me like a lightening.

In Paul comment I read two beautiful things.
The first one is "But when you watch them you can't help but wonder, why play any other way?"
This is so true!! It's like you put into words what I feel when I see player like Rondo playing the game, no matter the sport. There are some guys that play with body and soul and they touch something inside our soul in a way that it's really hard to explain. All the people I know still don't understand why I love sport so much. It's like they can't feel the warm of burning fires like Rondo.

Sorry, I'm not good with words.

The other phrase that I really liked is the one at the end: "This man is about to change the game. And then he'll be gone into the night..."
This really seems Rondo's style, doesn't it??
Reply paul
11:00 AM on August 27, 2012 
Beautiful words, Morena. More than any other performance art, Sports is of the moment, it seems to me. That's one of the things that makes it hard to explain. All performance arts are very much of the moment, but sports more than the others.
Reply Morena
11:56 AM on August 27, 2012 
paul says...
Beautiful words, Morena. More than any other performance art, Sports is of the moment, it seems to me. That's one of the things that makes it hard to explain. All performance arts are very much of the moment, but sports more than the others.

Thank you!!
You're right!! Maybe that's what make sport art moments so incredibly amazing
Reply paul
3:48 PM on August 27, 2012 
Morena says...
Thank you!!
You're right!! Maybe that's what make sport art moments so incredibly amazing


Something so intensely felt and yet so imbedded in time.