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Question of the day: Should KG have won MVP in 2008?

Posted by shawn cassidy on August 4, 2013 at 10:40 AM


We all know his resume, he changed the culture, and he was apart of the uprise of Celtic pride. He not only changed the culture of the Celtics, he helped lead them to the biggest regualr season turnaround in legaue history. The Celtics won an all-time best 42 more games than they did the year before. In 2007 the Celtics suffered through one of the worst years in team history, and the year later the Celtics tallied 66 wins, only one win shy of the team record 67 wins by the 1986 Celtics. So was KG robbed?


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6 Comments

Reply Greg
11:16 AM on August 4, 2013 
KG should have won the award,but only one thing mattered,and that was the ring. Let Kobe have it.
Reply paul
2:21 PM on August 4, 2013 
Poor KG. He got hit with the same thing Rondo gets hit with. 'You play with great teammates so that's why you're great'. Russell heard it. Cowens heard it. Bird heard it. Now he and Rondo have heard it. No one says it to Lebron, or Kobe, or to Chris Paul and Derron Williams, now that those two ESPN-beloved coach-killing whiners have gold-plated teams. Tony Parker hears it, as though Tim Duncan was really the reason that the Spurs almost won a championship last year. Ah well, KG is lucky he didn't win. Had he won, Bill Simmons would have spent the last 6 years trying to take it away from him.
Reply Franklin
2:24 PM on August 4, 2013 
Paul I love your respone. Always keeping it real.
Reply paul
2:41 PM on August 4, 2013 
Franklin says...
Paul I love your respone. Always keeping it real.


Lol! Thanks Franklin!

It's sad though, the way it almost seem like advanced statistics have become just a new way to strangle folks' ability to appreciate the essence of the game. I've often written here about the one day, the only day in my life, when I really became one with the game of basketball, when I really got in the flow. It only happened one time for more than a few minutes. We used to play round robin pickup - the team that won stayed on the floor, and the rest rotated. That night my team stayed on the floor all night long. I didn't score many points, nor did I grab many rebounds, nor make many steals, but I was the reason. I'm not being proud or anything. After all, I only played that well that one time. No player stays in that zone all the time. Most hardly ever reach it. A few players live near it though. KG is one. Rondo is another, I believe. But to understand, you have to feel the game as well as see it.
Reply shawn cassidy
4:43 PM on August 4, 2013 
paul says...
Poor KG. He got hit with the same thing Rondo gets hit with. 'You play with great teammates so that's why you're great'. Russell heard it. Cowens heard it. Bird heard it. Now he and Rondo have heard it. No one says it to Lebron, or Kobe, or to Chris Paul and Derron Williams, now that those two ESPN-beloved coach-killing whiners have gold-plated teams. Tony Parker hears it, as though Tim Duncan was really the reason that the Spurs almost won a championship last year. Ah well, KG is lucky he didn't win. Had he won, Bill Simmons would have spent the last 6 years trying to take it away from him.


That's the answer I was looking for this entire time. Parker should have been MVP this past season, but he missed a few games, and they gave it to James. The MVP award never makes much sense to me. They change what they look for all the time.
Reply paul
8:02 PM on August 4, 2013 
shawn cassidy says...
That's the answer I was looking for this entire time. Parker should have been MVP this past season, but he missed a few games, and they gave it to James. The MVP award never makes much sense to me. They change what they look for all the time.


On one hand, it's awfully hard to argue against giving the MVP to James. But then again, the voters really seem to lean towards power players, whose affect on the game is very visible, and who also rack up lots of numbers. Anyway, arguing that Tim Duncan is more to responsible for the Spurs recent success than Parker strikes me as being like arguing that Dwayne Wade deserves more credit than Lebron for the Heat's success.