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Celtics Legends Series: Dave Cowens on Manhood

Posted by shawn cassidy on November 11, 2011 at 12:45 PM

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Categories: Celtics Legends Series

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5 Comments

Reply paul
3:52 PM on November 11, 2011 
Thanks for this find, Shawn. Cowens is usually an interesting interview, because he is always very sincere. On the other hand, he always sounds like he is sort of half there. He never quite seems to ever think anything through.

In particular, I find his put down of the sixties bizarre and nauseating. I'm really tired of people knocking the sixties. There were a lot of good ideas in the sixties that have been forgotten since then. They said "all you need is love". We say "greed is good". Ok, which of those statements is closer to the truth?
Reply shawn cassidy
6:06 PM on November 11, 2011 
paul says...
Thanks for this find, Shawn. Cowens is usually an interesting interview, because he is always very sincere. On the other hand, he always sounds like he is sort of half there. He never quite seems to ever think anything through.

In particular, I find his put down of the sixties bizarre and nauseating. I'm really tired of people knocking the sixties. There were a lot of good ideas in the sixties that have been forgotten since then. They said "all you need is love". We say "greed is good". Ok, which of those statements is closer to the truth?



All you need is love for me. I always try to keep in mind what George Harrison talked about. I.me,mine. Try to take that out of your life,and you become a better person. Think of your fellow man,and just don't think for your own well being.
Reply paul
9:24 PM on November 11, 2011 
shawn cassidy says...
All you need is love for me. I always try to keep in mind what George Harrison talked about. I.me,mine. Try to take that out of your life,and you become a better person. Think of your fellow man,and just don't think for your own well being.


I hear you, though I think more in terms of balancing concern for self and concern for others.
Reply shawn cassidy
10:09 PM on November 11, 2011 
paul says...
I hear you, though I think more in terms of balancing concern for self and concern for others.



I don't practice the religion, but I like the thought. Taking out the ego in who we are.,
I Me Mine is the ego problem. There are two 'I's: the little 'i' when people say 'I am this'; and the big 'I' - ie duality and ego. There is nothing that isn't part of the complete whole. When the little 'i' merges into the big 'I' then you are really smiling!
?George Harrison


The set of pronouns which forms the song's title is a conventional way of referring to the ego in a Hindu context. For example, the Bhagavad Gita 2:71-72 can be translated as "They are forever free who renounce all selfish desires and break away from the ego-cage of "I", "me" and "mine" to be united with the Lord. This is the supreme state. Attain to this, and pass from death to immortality." Perhaps subconsciously, the song also reflects Harrison's reaction to the clashes of egos in the Beatles' painful closing days as a group.
Reply paul
10:28 PM on November 11, 2011 
shawn cassidy says...
I don't practice the religion, but I like the thought. Taking out the ego in who we are.,
I Me Mine is the ego problem. There are two 'I's: the little 'i' when people say 'I am this'; and the big 'I' - ie duality and ego. There is nothing that isn't part of the complete whole. When the little 'i' merges into the big 'I' then you are really smiling!
?George Harrison


The set of pronouns which forms the song's title is a conventional way of referring to the ego in a Hindu context. For example, the Bhagavad Gita 2:71-72 can be translated as "They are forever free who renounce all selfish desires and break away from the ego-cage of "I", "me" and "mine" to be united with the Lord. This is the supreme state. Attain to this, and pass from death to immortality." Perhaps subconsciously, the song also reflects Harrison's reaction to the clashes of egos in the Beatles' painful closing days as a group.


I think that's a great insight into Harrison's reaction to the ego clashes in the Beatles as they broke up. He was always sort of the kid brother. Interestingly, one might have thought that Harrison would have the one fastest out of the gate when the Beatles broke up, since he'd always felt that his song-writing contributions were under-appreciated, but he seemed to lose confidence in himself outside the supportive surroundings of the group, and weirdest of all, he seemed to lose confidence in his guitar!

But then again, maybe he's already shared his main message with the world - and there's certainly no message more powerful or more important. I just hate to hear folks diss the sixties. If we saw the larger picture a little more, in terms of love, we could have a much better world tomorrow.